About Us

Our Story

In 2015, two women, one black and one white, who shared a belief that Americans knowing more about each other is the surest path to unity forged a partnership and began their journey to uncover hidden black history. Their quest is to demonstrate that black history is American history and foster racial harmony.

Their personal stories show that the partnership of Sandra K. Yocum, who is white and Frances Presley Rice, who is black, was destined.

This fantastic and unlikely partnership began when Yocum wrote a letter to Rice expressing her concern and seeking advice about ending black generational poverty.

In response, Rice stated her view that the first step to breaking the cycle of poverty is to demonstrate with examples that black Americans are talented, capable people who have and can achieve success against the odds. Rice suggested that Yocum research black history, uncover success stories, and craft lesson plans designed to inspire young people to overcome obstacles and succeed.

Yocum accepted the challenge, began her research in 2016, and completed 14 lesson plans in 2018.

Yocum and Rice co-founded the Yocum African American History Association in 2018 as a non-profit organization and posted the lesson plans online. Individuals who read the lesson plans stated how pleased they were to find such comprehensive and well-researched black history.

When a publisher, Paragon House, contacted Rice with an endorsement request for a book written by one of her acquaintances, Rice inquired about whether Paragon House would publish the 14 lesson plans. After reviewing the 14 lesson plans, Paragon House decided to publish the 14 lesson plans as an
eBook and Rice redrafted the 14 lesson plans into eBook format. The eBook with the title Black History 1619-2019 was published and released on December 15, 2019.

Subsequently, Yocum and Rice agreed with Paragon House to publish a printed edition of the book with a release date of January 15, 2021.

Rice commissioned Black Seeds, a documentary inspired by the book, with Vol 1 released in 2020, and Vol 2 released in 2021.

Sandra K. Yocum,
Founder/President

Sandra K. Yocum has a B.F.A. and an Education K-12 teaching certificate. The experiences she gained in the late 1960s as a second-grade teacher in the predominately black community in Watts, Los Angeles, California, and made her compassionate about civil rights. She became a student of black history and shared her knowledge with people who did not know how blacks for centuries overcame obstacles and achieved success.

Over the years, she had helped minority students as a tutor, mentor, art instructor, and program coordinator with various non-profit organizations, including Let’s Make a Difference, Youth Excellence Performing Arts Workshop, and Students With a Goal. Her interest in black history and civil rights caused her to compile her extensive research and write the book, Black History 1619 to 2019: An Illustrated and Documented African American History. As founder and president of the Yocum African American History Association, she is dedicated to preserving black history.

Frances Presley Rice,
Vice President

Frances P. Rice is a twenty-year Army veteran who retired as a lieutenant colonel in 1984. She holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of California, Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, California; a Master of Business degree from Drury College, Springfield, Missouri.

During her time on active duty, she was awarded several distinguished medals and upon retirement, she was awarded the Legion of Merit for her years of exceptionally meritorious service. At that time, she was accorded the distinction of being one of America’s top 100 Black Business and Professional Women by Dollars and Sense Magazine’s editorial board.

Starting in the early 1960s, she began studying black history and acquired in-depth knowledge that proved invaluable as she co-founded the Yocum African American History Association. She collaborated in writing the Black History 1619 to 2019: An Illustrated and Documented African American History. She is dedicated to the restoration and preservation of the events which shaped the lives of African Americans.

Our Mission

The Yocum African American History Association’s mission is to broaden the knowledge of the cultural sector, educational community, and the public by making available documented African American history.

Our Vision: The vision of the Yocum African American History Association is to have our documented African American history available in libraries, schools and online platforms with public access.

Our Beliefs for Black History

We believe that sharing black history, which includes the significant contributions blacks made in American history, is vital. In furtherance of this belief, Yocum African American History Association (YAAHA) created a series of lesson plans for middle and high school students that are impeccably sourced and cited to provide an unvarnished story of 400 years of black history.

We believe that the hundreds of original and historically accurate graphs, maps, broadsides, and photographs we procured prevent the limited and stereotypical views of African American history.

We believe that knowledge is power and education is the key to success.

We believe in equal opportunity, which involves the provision of an opportunity to compete equally, not guarantee equal outcomes. This belief leads us to support school choice for all students.

The Misconceptions of Black History

Misconception:

Slavery is America’s original sin

Slavery is a universal institution, older than written records and flourished throughout the world long before the New World was discovered. Many whites are plagued with “white guilt” because they believe this is America’s “original sin.”

Fact:

Only black people
were slaves in America

Misconception:

England sent white slaves: criminals, vagabonds, and children to the colonies to work.

Fact:

There were only
white slave owners in America

Misconception:

Fact:

1830, U.S. Census reported 3,775 free blacks owned 12,740 slaves; 1860 U.S. Census reported 261,988 Southern blacks were free and not slaves. Anthony Johnson was the first black slave owner to win a court case that sanctioned slavery in the Virginia Colony.

Misconception:

Abraham Lincoln was a racist

Lincoln objected to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, “because it assumes that there can be moral right in the enslaving of one man by another. I object to it as a dangerous dalliance for a [free] people…”; his House Divided Speech, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” And finally, it is true that during the Civil War, Lincoln’s first aim was to keep the nation together at all costs, then turn his attention on freeing the slaves.

Fact:

There were only a few black leaders before the 20th Century

Misconception:

There were more than 2000 significant black leaders during Reconstruction with important city, state, national positions.

Fact:

The KKK was started by conservative Republicans

Misconception:

Democrats started various vigilante groups like the KKK to intimidate and prevent newly freed slaves from governing, voting, and leading their communities in the Southern states. The KKK and Jim Crow caused a huge gap in the progress of blacks.

Fact:

Democrats are responsible for the Brown V. Board of Education Case, 1954

Misconception:

It actually took 18 years for this ruling to be completely enacted due to segregation promoted by Democrats like Governors Hollings, Barnett, Davis, Faubus, and Wallace. President Eisenhower sent federal troops to begin the desegregation process in Little Rock, Arkansas in September 1957.

Fact:

The 1964 Civil Rights Act was passed by the efforts of President Lyndon Johnson

Misconception:

Republican Senator Everette Dirksen was responsible for getting the bill passed. He was also responsible for the passing of other Civil Rights Bills in 1957, 1960. 1965, and 1968.

Fact:

Misconception:

Systematic racism and “white supremacy” are the roots of black poverty

It is liberal supremacy and the race grievance industry that tells blacks you can’t be successful, and this is harming the black community. Dr. Shelby Steele said, “Democrats perpetuate the belief that whites are privileged and blacks are victims in need of unending affirmative action.”

Fact:

Two major political parties switched sides on racism

Misconception:

Franklin D. Roosevelt created dependency programs in the New Deal for whites and blacks to end the Great Depression. In doing so, these dependency programs caused more blacks to vote a Democratic ticket.

Fact:

Welfare has helped the black community

Misconception:

Welfare destroyed the black family; in 1950, less than 25% of black families were a one-parent household. By 2019, 75% of black families were one-parent families.

Fact:

America is a racist country

Misconception:

Barack Obama was elected twice as President

Fact:

YAAHA is dedicated to encouraging harmonious race relations by educating the public on 400 years of African American history.

Your contribution will help us provide learning tools and references to advance our goal of educating those eager to learn more about black history in the United States.

Donations will support our campaign to use our book, lesson plans, and various communication tools to educate all Americans, especially black Americans, of their ancestral history from 1619 to present day.

Donors will receive exclusive advance notices about YAAHA events and activities.

Donations over $100 will receive a copy of our book BLACK HISTORY 1619-2019: An Illustrated and Documented African-American History

Misconception:

Slavery is America’s original sin

Slavery is a universal institution, older than written records and flourished throughout the world long before the New World was discovered. Many whites are plagued with “white guilt” because they believe this is America’s “original sin.”

Fact:

Only black people
were slaves in America

Misconception:

England sent white slaves: criminals, vagabonds, and children to the colonies to work.

Fact:

There were only
white slave owners in America

Misconception:

Fact:

1830, U.S. Census reported 3,775 free blacks owned 12,740 slaves; 1860 U.S. Census reported 261,988 Southern blacks were free and not slaves. Anthony Johnson was the first black slave owner to win a court case that sanctioned slavery in the Virginia Colony.

Misconception:

Abraham Lincoln was a racist

Lincoln objected to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, “because it assumes that there can be moral right in the enslaving of one man by another. I object to it as a dangerous dalliance for a [free] people…”; his House Divided Speech, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” And finally, it is true that during the Civil War, Lincoln’s first aim was to keep the nation together at all costs, then turn his attention on freeing the slaves.

Fact:

There were only a few black leaders before the 20th Century

Misconception:

There were more than 2000 significant black leaders during Reconstruction with important city, state, national positions.

Fact:

The KKK was started by conservative Republicans

Misconception:

Democrats started various vigilante groups like the KKK to intimidate and prevent newly freed slaves from governing, voting, and leading their communities in the Southern states. The KKK and Jim Crow caused a huge gap in the progress of blacks.

Fact:

Democrats are responsible for the Brown V. Board of Education Case, 1954

Misconception:

It actually took 18 years for this ruling to be completely enacted due to segregation promoted by Democrats like Governors Hollings, Barnett, Davis, Faubus, and Wallace. President Eisenhower sent federal troops to begin the desegregation process in Little Rock, Arkansas in September 1957.

Fact:

The 1964 Civil Rights Act was passed by the efforts of President Lyndon Johnson

Misconception:

Republican Senator Everette Dirksen was responsible for getting the bill passed. He was also responsible for the passing of other Civil Rights Bills in 1957, 1960. 1965, and 1968.

Fact:

Misconception:

Systematic racism and “white supremacy” are the roots of black poverty

It is liberal supremacy and the race grievance industry that tells blacks you can’t be successful, and this is harming the black community. Dr. Shelby Steele said, “Democrats perpetuate the belief that whites are privileged and blacks are victims in need of unending affirmative action.”

Fact:

Two major political parties switched sides on racism

Misconception:

Franklin D. Roosevelt created dependency programs in the New Deal for whites and blacks to end the Great Depression. In doing so, these dependency programs caused more blacks to vote a Democratic ticket.

Fact:

Welfare has helped the black community

Misconception:

Welfare destroyed the black family; in 1950, less than 25% of black families were a one-parent household. By 2019, 75% of black families were one-parent families.

Fact:

America is a racist country

Misconception:

Barack Obama was elected twice as President

Fact:

YAAHA is dedicated to encouraging harmonious race relations by educating the public on 400 years of African American history.

Your contribution will help us provide learning tools and references to advance our goal of educating those eager to learn more about black history in the United States.

Donations will support our campaign to use our book, lesson plans, and various communication tools to educate all Americans, especially black Americans, of their ancestral history from 1619 to present day.

Donors will receive exclusive advance notices about YAAHA events and activities.

Donations over $100 will receive a copy of our book BLACK HISTORY 1619-2019: An Illustrated and Documented African-American History